Cool facts about the amazing seahorse

By Stef Zisovska
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Cool facts about the amazing seahorse

Stef Zisovska
 
Seahorse - Author: 
shellac - CC BY 2.0
Seahorse - Author: shellac - CC BY 2.0
 
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The seahorse is one of the most beautiful and intriguing creatures that exist on our planet. It is rare to meet a person that’s not fascinated by this strange, gentle-looking marine animal. But its unique appearance is not the only interesting thing about the seahorse. There are many amazing facts connected with the seahorse that you probably don’t know about, and now’s the time to discover what they are. Let’s get started!

Male Seahorses give birth to the babies

Seahorse baby – Author:jidanchaomian – CC BY-SA 2.0
Seahorse baby – Author:
jidanchaomian – CC BY-SA 2.0

Yes, they are different from any other species on the planet. The female seahorse carries the eggs and deposits them in the pouch of the male’s abdomen when mating time comes. The male then becomes ‘pregnant’ and carries the eggs until they are ready to be born. The female leaves around 50 eggs in the male’s pouch, and from every pregnancy up to 1500 baby seahorses will be born. After depositing the eggs in the male’s abdomen, the female seahorse starts producing new ones right away and getting ready for a new mating. In order to keep the species alive, they need to reproduce all the time.

The seahorse is a fish

The seahorse doesn’t look like a typical fish, but it is classified as one. There are many characteristics, including gills to breathe, fins to propel them through the water, and a swim bladder, that are the same ones that every fish has. The dorsal fin on the back of the seahorse is another specific thing that the fish has.

Seahorses have no teeth and no stomach

These tiny creatures need to eat all the time to stay alive because they have no stomach to digest the food. Everything they eat goes through their body immediately, so they need to eat constantly. A seahorse can consume up to 3000 brine shrimps in one day. Plankton and tiny fish are also on the menu.

They mate for life

Seahorse Love – Author:John Dalton – CC BY-SA 2.0
Seahorse Love – Author:
John Dalton – CC BY-SA 2.0

Seahorses are monogamous creatures, and they stay with one partner for their whole life. Their courtship includes dancing around each other, displaying different colors, spinning, and swimming together. The whole mating ritual can last up to eight hours.

Their eyes work independently of one another

Seahorses have amazing eyesight that is unlike any other marine creature. Their eyes can work independently of one another which allows them to be aware of their surroundings all the time. For example, one eye can look forward, and the other one can see what’s going on behind. This also helps them to locate prey easily.

They have their own version of fingerprints

Seahorses have a special characteristic that can be compared with the fingerprints in humans. A small crown, referred to as a coral net, is different on every seahorse in both its size and design. Incredible, right?

They are bad swimmers

Seahorses are clumsy swimmers because of their body shape. When caught in a sea storm and raging waves, they often die of exhaustion.

They don’t have many predators

Their bony structure h them helps them stay alive and keeps the predators away. Not too many creatures would like to eat a seahorse, and will go for something meatier instead. The major threat to seahorses are the humans that harvest them faster than they can reproduce which is becoming a huge problem for their survival.

Seahorses are beautiful, tiny creatures and you should consider yourself as a lucky person if you get to see one in their natural habitat.

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