Galaxy Note 7 banned amid Security concerns for Fire-Prone Batteries

By Doug Williams
Publish Date:
 

Galaxy Note 7 banned amid Security concerns for Fire-Prone Batteries

Doug Williams
 
 
SHARE:


Picture above is the Galaxy Note 4, a safer option?

 

We keep hearing the various drawbacks of adhering to a purely smartphone-based life in terms of psychological slavery and what not, however, who would have thought that these tiny smart machines could cause us physical harm. Flammable smart devices are certainly a phenomenon unheard of in the domain of mobile phones.

Air transport has always been touchy when it comes to what is and what isn’t potentially harmful once hundreds of people are airborne. For instance; cutlery, liquids, lighters, etc. have always been objects of concern for airline safety.

 

However, now a number of Airline safety organizations around the world have advised passengers to be especially mindful of Samsung’s new Galaxy Note 7 smartphone when traveling by air.

This move came after the news of Samsung’s fire prone battery surfaced all over the web with people sharing pictures of exploded devices and some even incurred injuries due to the exploding batteries.

U.S. Federal Aviation Administration has issued a press release suggesting that it has adequately informed passengers and a number of airlines that all Samsung devices and particularly the notorious Galaxy Note 7 must not be charged mid-air and that passengers do need to declare the device during the security screening.

The South Korean manufacturer Samsung has already announced that it has issued the orders to recall all Galaxy Note 7 smartphones with the ‘lethal’ batteries and that they have taken up the issue seriously and are investigating all aspects of this flaw.

Contact samsung if you need to use their Galaxy Note 7 replacement programme
Contact samsung if you need to use their Galaxy Note 7 replacement programme

The most recent airliner that decided to ban the dangerous phone on board their flights is Singapore Airlines Ltd that followed suit after a number of Australian airlines also banned the phone. Singapore Airline issued a statement suggesting that it has prohibited powering up and charging all Samsung devices on board their flights for the safety of passengers and crew.

 

Even after Samsung’s recall decision Australian airlines such as Qantas Airways, Virgin Australia Holdings Ltd, and Jetstar Airways Ltd went ahead with their decision of banning the passenger from charging or even using Samsung phones.

Although passengers are not barred from carrying their phones they have been prohibited to use the on-board USB ports to charge their phones especially Galaxy Note 7. Australia’s aviation regulator said that the radical move is in line with the international safety standards and that it has consulted other airlines and various safety boards before making the decision of banning the potentially dangerous phones.

Some critics have said that as the number of airlines banning the smartphones dramatically increases due to the lack of knowledge or pure paranoia, passengers now face a true dilemma with the prospects of banning the electronic devices on flights altogether become a possibility.

Air transport has always been a touchy when it comes to what is and what isn’t potentially harmful once hundreds of people are airborne. For instance; cutlery, liquids, lighters, etc. have always been objects of concern for airline safety. However, now a number of Airline safety organizations around the world have advised passengers to be especially mindful of Samsung’s new Galaxy Note 7 smartphone when travelling by air. This move came after the news of Samsung’s fire prone battery surfaced all over the web with people sharing pictures of exploded devices and some even incurred injuries due to the exploding batteries. U.S. Federal Aviation Administration has issued a press release suggesting that it has adequately informed passengers and a number of airlines that all Samsung devices and particularly the notorious Galaxy Note 7 must not be charged mid-air, and that passengers do need to declare the device during the security screening.

The South Korean manufacturer Samsung has already announced that it has issued the orders to recall all Galaxy Note 7 smartphones with the ‘lethal’ batteries and that they have taken up the issue seriously and are investigating all aspects of this flaw. The most recent airliner that decided to ban the dangerous phone on board their flights are Singapore Airlines Ltd that followed the suit after a number of Australian airlines also banned the phone. Singapore Airline issued a statement suggesting that it has prohibited powering up and charging all Samsung devices on board their flights for the safety of passengers and crew.

Even after Samsung’s recall decision Australian airlines such as Qantas Airways, Virgin Australia Holdings Ltd, and Jetstar Airways Ltd went ahead with their decision of banning the passenger from charging or even using Samsung phones. Although passengers are not barred from carrying their phones they have been prohibited to use the on-board USB ports to charge their phones especially Galaxy Note 7. Australia’s aviation regulator said that the radical move is in line with the international safety standards and that it has consulted other airlines and various safety boards before making the decision of banning the potentially dangerous phones, Thanh Nien News reported.

Some critics have said that as the number of airlines banning the smartphones dramatically increases due to the lack of knowledge or pure paranoia, passengers now face a true dilemma with the prospects of banning the electronic devices on flights altogether become a possibility.

 
© Copyright 2015–2021 - Outdoor Revival