How to Make a Paracord Pouch for Survival Tins

By Paul Pinkerton
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How to Make a Paracord Pouch for Survival Tins

Paul Pinkerton
 
 
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In this article I will be showing you guys how to make an Altoids Tins Pouch out of paracord. For many outdoors-people or survivalists, Altoids tins are the perfect containers for a small, pocket sized survival tin. I like using the pouch for my survival tin so I can pack more stuff into the tin and not worry about it popping open.

Here’s a list of terms that will help you understand the instructions:

A slot: The A slot is any outside slot found on the border.

 

B slot: The B slot is any inside slot found on the border.

Border: The border is the Gold Solomon Bar we braided in steps 2 – 4.

Center Box/Zoomed Image: The center box is a zoomed in box which shows closer, more detailed images. They occasionally shows up in the center of the diagram throughout several steps.

Diagram: The diagram is the whole image itself, with the different quadrants or sections (parts) inside of it.

Foundation Cords: The foundation cords are the from the marker line down towards the loop. The foundation cords will be what we are braiding around to form the border of the paracord pouch.

 

Horizontal Weaves/Threads: The horizontal weaves are the weaves that go from the left of the pouch to the right and vise versa.

Left Working Cord: The left working cord is the current cord that is on the left side of the foundation cords. Notice, once the left working cord is transferred over to the right side, it becomes the right working cord and vise versa.

NOTICE: A notice simply presents a tip, or suggestion on how to go about a certain step or part.

Options/Alternative Methods: Options represent alternative ways to achieve the particular part or step.

Part: A part represents a sectioned off portion of the overall diagram.

Right Working Cord: The right working cord is the current cord that is on the right side of the foundation cords. Notice, once the right working cord is transferred over to the left side, it becomes the left working cord and vise versa.

Step: A step represents the step itself. There are 13 steps overall in this DIY Tutorial on how to make a paracord pouch for an Altoids tin.

Vertical Weaves/Thread: The vertical weaves are the weaves that go from the top of the pouch to the bottom and vise versa.

Working Cords: Working cords are the cords you’re currently working with. Whether you’re weaving, threading or braiding with a specific cord, that is considered a working cord.

Step 1: What You’ll Need

 

  • 20 feet paracord color one (You shoul get 550 Paracord)
  • 20 feet paracord color two
  • Altoids tin
  • Marker
  • Scissors
  • Lighter
  • Paracord Fid Needle

 

If you want a one color pouch, you can totally use two 20 foot lengths of cord that are the same color. Although if it were me, I’d use one 40 foot length and make no cuts from beginning to end.

Step 2: Measuring for Border of Pouch


For the first step you are going to need your border cord. Grab the color cord you want to be the border.

  1. Fold your cord directly in half and make a loop like shown in diagram one.
  2. Place it on the side of your Altoids tin leave the loop exposed above the tin a little bit. Note: This loop is the loop which the carabiner clips to (as you can see in the picture in the introduction). You can make this as big as you want.
  3. Wrap the loose ends of paracord neatly around the tin. Left, bottom, and right side.
  4. It should look like this when you are done.

*To make it easier for you, you can use the marker and mark your paracord here.

Step 3: Starting Your Cobra Braid for Border

Body cords: The body cords are the cords below the marker line in part 1. They act as one and shouldn’t be separated.
Left working cord: The left working cord is simply the cord that is currently to the left of your body cords.
Right working cord: The right working cord is simply the cord that is currently to the right of your body cords.

Please continue reading below

  1. Position your cord like shown in part 1. Notice where I marked my length with the marker. We will be working with the cord above the line created with the marker.
  2. Like shown in part 2, you’re going to take the left working cord and thread it underneath the body cords.
  3. Now take your right working cord and thread it under the cord you just brought over from the left side, and continue it over the body cords.
  4. Now continue that same cord from part 3 up and through the loop as shown in part 4 of the picture.
  5. This diagram simply shows you what the first cobra braid should look like. Notice: I kept the marker line relatively close to the top of the braid. Make sure it’s in the braid somewhere or you could mess up your measurement.

Step 4: Completing Second Braid and Tightening Things Up

  1. Thread your new right working cord underneath your body cords.
  2. Thread your new left working cord underneath the cord you just brought over and continue it over the body cords.
  3. Continue the same cord from part 2 and bring it up through the loop like shown in part 3.

From here on out you are going to alternate steps 3 and 4 until you get to the end of your measured body cords. Remember to leave a good 1/2″ to an 1″ of that loop at the end exposed.

4. After every 5 or so braids you’re going to want to tighten up your braids. This is a crucial step. Hold the body cords in one hand and push up on the braids you’ve made using your other hand. You’ll notice they will slide up the body cords and tighten up.

Step 5: Finishing the Border

 

  1. Before cutting your working cords see if it fits around your Altoids tin properly. If you need a few more braids and left a big enough loop, you can go ahead and braid a few more times.
  2. Cut the working cords off.
  3. Using a lighter, light the ends for 5-7 seconds until you get them nice and molten. Use your thumb and smoothen it out so it’s wider than the hole it came through. See part 3 to get an idea of what you’re looking for. ***Be Careful! If you want you can lick your thumb or wet it before doing this part.
  4. This is what you want to end up with when your border is done.

 

Step 6: Starting Your Horizontal Weaves.


For this step you’re going to need your Altoids tin, your other color cord, and your Paracord Fid Needle.
Position your border around your Altoids tin with the loop at the top right (like shown in the diagram).
When threading you’ll notice two SLOTS you could thread your needle through. This is shown in the center diagram using an “A” and “B.” Besides this step, you will ALWAYS thread through the A (OUTSIDE) slot. For this step it helps hide the knot better on the inside of the pouch.

  1. Using your needle thread your cord through the bottom right corner like shown in part 1 of the diagram. Again: I threaded this first time only through the B, or inside slot.
  2. Take your needle off the cord and tie a knot on the inside of the pouch.
  3. Re-attach your needle and bring the cord across the Altoids tin and thread it through the opposite corner in an A slot around and back through the adjacent A slot. This is shown in detail in the center diagram.
  4. Carry your cord back across the Altoids tin and again thread it through the next A slot.

Step 7: Continuing Your Horizontal Weave

 

  1. This part shows you in detail which slots to go through. Again, your using the A slot (outside) like shown in the zoomed in area of part 1.
  2. Continue the pattern until you’ve weaved all the way to the top of the Altoids tin.

Step 8: Transfering Cord to Opposite Side

 

  1. If you end up with no more A slots to come back through, simply carry your thread right over to the other side like shown in detail in part 1 of this diagram.
  2. Now you’re going to thread your cord on the inside of the border to get your cord to the other side of the pouch to begin your horizontal weave on that side. This is shown in part 2 of this diagram in great detail.

Please continue reading below

Step 9: Side Two Horizontal Weaves

 

  1. Like the other side, thread through an A slot.
  2. Around and back through the adjacent A slot.
  3. Weave all the way down until you are out of A slots on the sides of the tin.

Step 10: Starting Your Vertical Weaves


On the previous step your cord ended up on the outside of the border. Simply weave your cord back through into the middle using an A slot.

  1. Once back on the inside start your vertical weave like shown in part 1 of the diagram. Remember…Over…Under…Over…Under.
  2. Once finished it will most likely look like this.
  3. Scrunch up or tighten your weave like shown here.
  4. Loop around that very top horizontal weave and weave back down towards the bottom of the pouch.

Step 11: Continuing Your Vertical Weaves

 

  1. Just like your horizontal weaves you’re going to come out through an A slot.
  2. Again like your horizontal weaves loop around and come back through the adjacent A slot.
  3. Continue to weave up and down until you run out of A slots.

Step 12: Transfering Cord to Opposite Side Smoothly


Now, this could get overwhelming and looks intense. But stay focused and follow closely. By doing it this way, we will keep our pattern consistent with the rest of the border, and also avoid having a rogue line going across your border by hiding the cord on the inside of the pouch while we transfer it over to the other side.

  1. The red arrow is a reference for part 2 and 3. Notice we are on the side that was just woven. In part 2 and 3 you will flip it over and work on the opposite side.
  2. It should look like this.
  3. Good luck. :):)
  4. Follow closely. Remember this is crucial for keeping your pattern consistent and hiding that cord on the inside of the pouch while transferring it to the other side.

Step 13: Starting Your Vertical Weaves on Opposite Side

 

  1. You should now have something that looks like this.
  2. Like you’ve done on the other side, weave the cord through the horizontal cords. Remember to keep it nice and snug.
  3. Just like always, come out through an A slot.
  4. Around and back through an A slot.
  5. Continue across the whole pouch until out of A slots.

Step 14: Finalizing Your Pouch

 

  1. Once you thread your cord through the last A slot on the bottom of your pouch, it should look like this.
  2. Cut the cord right up close to the pouch.
  3. Melt the cord with your lighter for approximately 5-7 seconds. You’re looking for a molten hot look once it’s hot enough. Take your thumb and smoothen it out, so it’s wider than the hole it came through. Be Careful! You may need to lick your thumb or wet it before doing this.
  4. It should look something like this.

When you’ve made your pouch post up some pics so we can see them on our Facebook page.

 

Thanks so much to Anthony for providing this article, you can see the original article from ‘Anthony Vale’ HERE on his Dude DIY blog

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