The spookiest towns in America

By Stef Zisovska
Publish Date:
 

The spookiest towns in America

Stef Zisovska
 
Bodie
Bodie
 
SHARE:


Believing in ghosts is not necessary in order to enjoy these towns. The eerie settlements were once very much alive and full of hustle and bustle.

Today they are collections of buildings and constructions that tell the story of a long forgotten past.

The West is full of former mining and railroad towns that were once thriving with life.

These epicentres of industrial development are now ghost towns that people don’t care about anymore, but they still exist as a reminder of past centuries. Here’s a short list of the spookiest towns in the country.

Kennicott 
Kennicott 

Bodie, California

This is the most famous ghost town in California and probably in the country. Founded in 1859, Bodie was a gold mining capital. It’s America’s largest ghost town and also one of the coldest places in the States besides Alaska.

Located in Bodie Hills east of Sierra Nevada, this ghost town became a Bodie State Historic Park in 1962. If planning a visit do it before November to avoid low temperatures.

Bodie
Bodie

Elk Falls, Kansas

Elk Falls is a town in Elk County in Kansas, and it takes its name from a waterfall on the Elk River. It was founded in 1870’s by  R.H. Nichols who built the first flour mill. Today, a handful of original houses still stands in its primary configuration.

Elk Falls Photo Credit
Elk Falls Photo Credit

Kennecott, Alaska

Kennecott is an abandoned mining camp in the Valdez-Cordova Census area in Alaska. Almost all of the old buildings remain in good condition, although the town has been empty for a long time.

Today it is under the protection of the National Park Service and it functions as a museum. Organized tours are available for visitors who like to see the old mines.

Kennecott Photo Credit
Kennecott Photo Credit

St. Elmo, Colorado

St. Elmo is one of the best-preserved ghost towns in the US. It was founded in 1870’s when gold and silver were found in the nearby Rocky Mountains.

Many of the buildings became private properties and were completely renovated. Most of the structures in the town reflect the original construction.

St. Elmo Photo Credit
St. Elmo Photo Credit

Garnet, Montana

Granet is a small ghost town in Granite County, Montana. It was also a mining town where fire-red garnets were found. There were also reserves of gold which was the primary quest of the prospectors.

The town was destroyed in a severe fire in 1912. Today around 30 buildings still remain including cabins, saloon and a part of an old hotel.

Garnet Photo Credit
Garnet Photo Credit

South Pass City, Wyoming

This is one of the most authentic towns in the Old West. It was founded in 1867, and the main activity of the people living here was mining.

It is located north of the Oregon Trail in Fremont County, Wyoming. Dozens of original buildings can be still seen today. Cabins, restaurants, dance halls and a jail are some of the features that can be visited on a guided tour during the summer season.

South Pass City Photo Credit
South Pass City Photo Credit

If you don’t have any plans for the summer, this is a perfect way of getting know more about American history and its mining past.

Taking a visit to these ghost towns can open a new perspective on how you see the country today.

 
© Copyright 2015–2021 - Outdoor Revival