Oregon’s coastline hiking paradise

By Stef Zisovska
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Oregon’s coastline hiking paradise

Stef Zisovska
 
Oregon Coast Trail. Author: Dave Riggs - CC BY-SA 2.0
Oregon Coast Trail. Author: Dave Riggs - CC BY-SA 2.0
 
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Everyone who visits the coast of Oregon can’t help but be mesmerized by its beauty and the hiking trails that are simply jaw-dropping. If planning to make a weekend trip you won’t regret it if you visit this beautiful part of the country with your friends and family and you’re certain to take some unforgettable memories back home. What you see while hiking the Oregon coast is a treat for your eyes. The region is one of the most picturesque in the whole country, so it would be a shame not to see it.

No other place has a coastline like Oregon, so if you like hiking through amazing landscapes, get ready for over 360 miles of the best hiking trails in the area. Sandy beaches occupy 200 miles of those, and the rest are constructed trails, mostly over headlands. Oregon has plenty of surprises for all hiking enthusiasts, hungry for new wilderness experiences. If you consider yourself as a serious hiker, you can’t miss this out.

Cape Sebastian

Cape Sebastian looking north – Author: Adbar – CC BY-SA 3.0
Cape Sebastian looking north – Author: Adbar – CC BY-SA 3.0

This is a 700 feet high summit on the southern coast that offers stunning views of the Pistol River beaches, sea stacks, and the green Hunters Island, home of various species of seabird. Whales are often spotted in the waves near the shore, which is a view worth remembering. Further south you can visit Samuel H. Boardman State Park, considered by many as the jewel of Oregon state. It’s one of the most scenic national parks in the world. Can’t miss it!

Blacklock Point

Cape Blanco looking south towards Port Orford Heads State Park, with Humbug Mountain in the background, Pinnacle Rock in the front ground – Author: Adbar – CC BY-SA 3.0
Cape Blanco looking south towards Port Orford Heads State Park, with Humbug Mountain in the background, Pinnacle Rock in the front ground – Author: Adbar – CC BY-SA 3.0

Blacklock Point is an undeveloped, hidden, and unknown part of the Oregon Coast that only the most enthusiastic hikers visit. It takes a long walk through mud to reach the point from where you can see Cape Blanco and its lighthouse, 100 feet tall sandstone cliffs stretching to the north, the offshore islands, and a 100 feet tall waterfall. Sounds like a fairy tale, right? If near, Blacklock Point is a must-see for all photography lovers that would like to add some special shots to their collections.

Umpqua Dunes 

Lone Ranch Beach, Oregon – Author: Adbar – CC BY-SA 3.0
Lone Ranch Beach, Oregon – Author: Adbar – CC BY-SA 3.0

A mile wide and 400 feet tall, Umpqua Dunes are the highest dunes in Oregon and also the sandiest part of the state. Due to the large amount of rainfall the area gets, the sand is always wet, but that’s good for hiking. No off-road vehicles are allowed in the area, which makes it perfect for peaceful walking.

Heceta Head

Heceta Head Lighthouse in Lane County, Oregon – Author: Cacophony – CC BY-SA 3.0
Heceta Head Lighthouse in Lane County, Oregon – Author: Cacophony – CC BY-SA 3.0

For a truly unique experience on the Oregon coast, hike the trail from Washburne State Park on the north and come out of the woods to see Oregon’s most photographed lighthouse. You can also approach it from Devil’s Elbow on the south side. Don’t walk this trail by night.

Cascade Head

Oregon Coast Trail north of House Rock Creek – Author: EncMstr – CC BY-SA 3.0
Oregon Coast Trail north of House Rock Creek – Author: EncMstr – CC BY-SA 3.0

Cascade Head Trail is an amazing part of the Oregon Coast, especially because of the rare Oregon silverspot butterfly that you can find here. The Nature Conservancy is asking hikers to avoid getting too close to the butterflies and not to touch them. Some species are too fragile and it’s not worth risking harming them for an Instagram photo. So, stick to just observing them.

Ecola State Park

Ecola State Park and Haystack Rock – Author: Brmuchim – CC BY-SA 3.0
Ecola State Park and Haystack Rock – Author: Brmuchim – CC BY-SA 3.0

There are two major trails in Ecola State Park, one is to the Crescent Beach that lies between Ecola and Chapman points, and the other trail is the one that connects Ecola Point with Indian Beach. From Indian Beach, you can see Tillamook Lighthouse on one of the islands offshore.

Cape Perpetua

Thor’s Well: a sinkhole at Cape Perpetua, Lincoln County, Oregon – Author: John Fowler – CC BY 2.0
Thor’s Well: a sinkhole at Cape Perpetua, Lincoln County, Oregon – Author: John Fowler – CC BY 2.0

The beautiful location is managed by the U.S. Forest Service. The trails that start at the visitor’s center lead to the Devil’s Churn, the tide pools, and the Cape Creek. Be aware of high tide when visiting the tide pools and be careful with the crushing waves at Devil’s Churn.

Now it’s up to you to plan your next hiking trip and choose a trail on the stunning coast of Oregon. Good luck and stay safe!

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