Spectacular ancient theaters that you can still visit

By Stef Zisovska
Publish Date:
 

Spectacular ancient theaters that you can still visit

Stef Zisovska
 
Odeon theater, Athens, Greece
Odeon theater, Athens, Greece
 
SHARE:


The theaters in ancient Athens, Greece were considered the highest form of art significant for the whole population. The legends and stories performed in front of the audience incorporated acting, poetry, music, and dance.

 

Ancient theater  
Ancient theater  

Ancient theaters are located all over Europe and the Middle East and have even bigger cultural value nowadays. As a home of cultural manifestations, they make art more available to a huge number of people and raise the consciousness of appreciating the magnificent architecture.

Also, these sites are an incredibly potent magnet for tourists from all over the world who like to feel the history spirit that roams these architectural giants.

 

The theater of Side

The city of Side is located in southern Turkey and was founded by the Greeks in the seventh century B.C. It includes gates, a temple, and a theater that can fit more than 15.000 people. In 25 B.C.

Side became a part of Roman Empire and was famous for trade with olive oil and slaves. In the expansion of Christianity, it was even used as a church.

 

Walls of the ancient theater of Side Photo Credit
Walls of the ancient theater of Side Photo Credit

The Roman theater of Bosra

South of Damascus, there is an ancient city called Bosra. It is one of the oldest cities on our planet and in A.D. 106 was conquered by the Romans and made the capital of Roman Arabia. It’s one of the best preserved Roman theaters in the world, with incredible acoustics and hosts 15.000 people.

 

Bosra theater Photo Credit
Bosra theater Photo Credit

The Greek theater of Taormina

Taormina is a town in Sicily and was a Greek colony in the 2nd century B.C. The theater has an incredible view of the Etna volcano and the blue waters if Mediterranean. It was extended and renovated over the period of the Roman Empire. Today it hosts international film, theater, and dance festivals.

 

Greek theater in Taormina Photo Credit
Greek theater in Taormina Photo Credit

The theater of Epidaurus

Epidaurus rises from the heart of Athens as the best ancient theater in the world. With its fifty-five rows of seats, this colossal construction awakens the artists in every single visitor.

 

The legendary acoustics of Epidaurus was a subject of speculations with decades. Is it the design of the seats or the winds carrying and amplifying the voices? This mystery remains unresolved until today.

 

Epidaurus Photo Credit
Epidaurus Photo Credit

The Odeon of Herodes Atticus 

Herodes Atticus built this theater in 161 A.D. in memory of his wife. Herodes was considered as the richest Greek in Athens at that time. Also, he was honored as a Roman citizen with all the privileges of that status.

He was a famous philosopher among royal Roman families and educated the emperors, Marcus Aurelius and Lucius Verus. The monument was first called “Odeon of Regilla” and after that, he changed the name into “Odeon of Herodes Atticus.”

 

Odeon of Herodes Atticus Photo Credit
Odeon of Herodes Atticus Photo Credit

Ancient theaters are still very much alive and welcoming visitors from all over the world.

The feeling you get when standing on the proscenium is amazing, you get to know what it felt like to be in front of 15,000 people and hear your voice echoing and reaching the last row without any amplifiers. For all you lovers of ancient architecture, one (or more) of these places can be a perfect place to visit this summer.

 

If you have any comments then please drop us a message on our Outdoor Revival Facebook page

If you have a good story to tell or blog let us know about it on our FB page, we’re also happy for article or review submissions, we’d love to hear from you.

We live in a beautiful world, get out there and enjoy it.

Outdoor Revival – Reconnecting us all with the Outdoors

 

 
© Copyright 2015–2021 - Outdoor Revival