Cool and Very Unique Dive Spots From All Over The World

By Todd Neikirk
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Cool and Very Unique Dive Spots From All Over The World

Todd Neikirk
 
(Image via Guillaume Barviare)
(Image via Guillaume Barviare)
 
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Considering that the Earth is covered by more than 70% water there are plenty of opportunities to study what lies beneath. With endless possibilities, it can be difficult to narrow down on one particular experience. Here are some of the coolest dives available worldwide.

Rummu Underwater Prison, Estonia

The remains of the abandoned Rummu Prison is Estonia are now a prime scuba destination
The remains of the abandoned Rummu Prison in Estonia are now a prime scuba destination (FOCUS/Toomas Tuul/Universal Images Group via Getty Images)

In the 1940s, prisoners in Estonia toiled away at Rummu prison. The jail there was built on a limestone quarry where the inmates were forced to work. In 1991, Estonia regained its independence from the USSR and the prison was shuttered in 1991.

With no one to look after the prison, the waters rose and the building soon filled up with water. Today, visitors can gain access to the area for a number of activities including paddle boarding and kayaking. Many, though, opt to scuba dive and get an up-close look at the sunken remains.

Yonaguni Monument, Japan

Japan's Yonaguni Monument is one of the more mysterious dive sights in the world
Japan’s Yonaguni Monument is one of the more mysterious dive sights in the world (Image via Melkov/Wikimedia Commons)

The Yonaguni monument was first discovered by Kihachiro Aratake in 1986. Aratake was in the water hoping to see Hammerhead sharks. Instead, he found a monument that has become an incredibly popular diving location.

The monument, thought by some to be an ancient lost city, is estimated to be 5,000-8,000 years old. There is also a debate over whether the monument was naturally occurring or carved. The only way to tell is by getting down there yourself.

Punta Loma Nature Reserve, Argentina

Punta Loma Nature Reserve features South America's only sea lion preserve
Punta Loma Nature Reserve features South America’s only sea lion preserve (Photo by: Universal History Archive/Universal Images Group via Getty Images)

Many people know of the outdoor clothing brand Patagonia, but they may not know about the South American region that the company is named after. Patagonia offers some of the best sightseeing and scuba diving in the world.

One place of particular note is the Punta Loma Nature reserve in Argentina. Punta Loma is home to South Americas only Sea Lion nature preserve. But there are a number of other unique examples of marine life like Magellan penguins, elephant seals and southern right whales.

Underwater Museum, Cancun, Mexico

An incredible museum installation was built in Cancun, Mexico
An incredible museum installation was built in Cancun, Mexico (Photo by: Luis Javier Sandoval/VW Pics/Universal Images Group via Getty Images)

While many popular underwater sights are naturally occurring, the underwater museum in Cancun, Mexico was manmade. The installation features 400 lifelike statues built beneath the sea.

There are two reasons for the project. One is to draw more tourism to the region. The second is an effort to create an artificial coral reef. If you’re into eco-tourism this is a great trip to add onto your bucket list.

Atlantic City Reef, New Jersey

An artificial reef has been created from old subway cars
An artificial reef has been created from old subway cars (Image via scdnr/Wikimedia Commons)

Many cities across the world have decided to create their own artificial reefs for conservation reasons. This is done by leaving extremely heavy items like ships or concrete structures on the ocean floor.

The Atlantic City reef is one of the more unusual artificial coral reef structures in the United States. In order to create the reef, the city used old subway cars.

McMurdo Sound, Antarctica

A scuba diver explores the freezing caves in Antarctica's McMurdo Sound
A scuba diver explores the freezing caves in Antarctica’s McMurdo Sound (Image via Rob Robbins/Wikimedia Commons/Public Domain)

An awful lot of scuba diving is done in tropical climates. But there are always going to be those adventurers who want a different kind of experience. The most extreme of these people head off the McMurdo Sound in Antarctica.

In order to access the water, divers first have to cut a hole in the icy surface. Once they’re down there, though, the views are spectacular. The pristine water is incredibly clear, giving divers limitless views of sea stars, urchins, and penguins.

Manta Ray Night Dives, Kona, Hawaii

Two manta rays feed during the nght-time
Two manta rays feed during the night-time (Image via Paul Hirst/Wikimedia Commons)

Some dives are best done during the day, but when it comes to manta rays, the best time to see them is at night. And one of the best places to check these out is in Kona in Hawaii.

At the Kona Manta Ray Night Dive spot, the area is lit to attract plankton. This in turn draws many of the area’s 250 manta rays to the site, creating an electric atmosphere for divers.

Silfra Fissure, Iceland

Divers can stand between two continents in the Silfra fissure in Iceland
Divers can stand between two continents in the Silfra fissure in Iceland (Image via ex nihil/Wikimedia Commons)

Most people have learned about the tectonic plates while in school. Not too many people, however, have had the opportunity to stand between two tectonic plates. This experience is offered by the Silfra fissure in Iceland.

Divers that swim down have the opportunity to stand between the American and Eurasian continental plates. In addition to the plates, tourists can also catch stunning views in the almost impossibly clear water.

The Neptune Memorial Reef, Florida

The Neptune Memorial Reef in Miami allows people to be buried in a dive site
The Neptune Memorial Reef in Miami allows people to be buried in a dive site (Image via Neptune Memorial Reef)

The Neptune Memorial Reef not only gives divers some incredible sights, but it also gives them to potential to someday be a part of the dive site. The artificial reef is both a dive spot and a cemetery.

Families who are interested in having their loved ones interred provide ashes which are then mixed with marine-grade cement. According to the owners, the installation is having the desired effect and marine life is now thriving in the area.

The Sardine Run, South Africa

Millions of sardines migrate up the South African coast each year
Millions of sardines migrate up the South African coast each year (Image via Lakshmi Sawitri/Wikimedia Commons)

Each year between May and June, millions of sardines migrate north to move toward colder waters. Experienced divers can head out to the coasts of the Eastern Cape and KwaZulu-Natal to experience the incredible sight.

The sardine run is about more than just the tiny fish, it is also about the predators who chase them. Divers will see dolphins, sharks, and whales all follow the pack and periodically come in for a bite.

 
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