The best plants and insects as a food source

By Nick Oetken
Publish Date:
 

The best plants and insects as a food source

Nick Oetken
 
Hazel Leaf-roller Apoderus Croyli Beetle Insect Red
Hazel Leaf-roller Apoderus Croyli Beetle Insect Red
 
SHARE:


One of the most crucial survival skills that everyone should know, is being able to find food that is safe to eat. While you can live for three weeks without food, the effects of going without it will come in only one day. First comes a headache, followed by energy loss, which will make your survival a lot difficult.

That’s why it’s critical to be able to find safe food in the wilderness. In the following article, you will learn which plants and insects to avoid, and which ones you should look for in the wilderness.

Plants to avoid

Some of the plants in the wild could be really dangerous. Make sure yo avoid them.
Some of the plants in the wild could be really dangerous. Make sure yo avoid them.

The old saying “It’s better to be safe than sorry” applies well to every survival situation. If you can’t identify a certain plant, you should stay away from it at any cost.

Here are few criteria for plants you should avoid:

  • Plants with thorns, hairs, and spines
  • Bitter plants
  • Plants with seeds inside pods
  • Milky or colored sap
  • Three-leaved pattern plants
  • Plants that have purple, pink, or black spurs
It’s best if you stay away from purple plants.
It’s best if you stay away from purple plants.

The signs above suggest that the pants are probably poisonous, and you should definitely avoid them. Even in desperate times, you cannot allow yourself to eat a poisonous plant. It’s better not to eat at all than to eat a toxic plant.

Insects to avoid

Not all of the insects are harmless.
Not all of the insects are harmless.

Insects can be a very viable source of food since they provide a lot of fats and proteins that plants don’t. Unfortunately, like some plants, there are few things you need to keep in mind when looking for an insect as a food source.

Make sure you avoid insects with the following criteria:

  • Strong odor insects
  • Insects with a visible stinger
  • Brightly colored insects (yellow, orange, or red)

Plants you can consume

Cattail

Cattail plant
Cattail plant

This plant can be found near freshwater, and they’ve been used for years by many Native Americans tribes. Before consuming the leaves of the cattail, you have to boil them. The stem and the rootstock can be eaten raw, all you need to do is wipe off the mud.

Clover

Either search for your luck, or you next meal.
Either search for your luck, or you next meal.

Clovers are usually found in open grassy areas. You can easily identify them, and eat them raw or boiled.

Asparagus

Wild asparagus can be very good for your survival.
Wild asparagus can be very good for your survival.

Don’t let the wild asparagus fool you. Although the one found in nature it’s thinner than the one in the stores, it can be even more nutritious. It’s better to boil it before consuming, but eating it raw won’t harm you.

Fireweed

Fireweed is a very good source of vitamins
Fireweed is a very good source of vitamins

Noted for its purple flowers and circular veins on the leaves, fireweed is also known for its richness in vitamin C and vitamin A. Like cattails, it was used by many Native American tribes in their diet, serving as a staple. It’s the best to eat the fireweed when it’s still young since mature fireweeds taste bitter.

Dandelion

Dandelion fower
Dandelion fower

You can see this plant everywhere around you, and you probably find it annoying. But, it can be a lifesaver in a survival situation. The best thing about dandelion is that every part of it is edible.

Wood Sorrel

Wood Sorrel is very good for medical treatments
Wood Sorrel is very good for medical treatments

Apart from being edible when it’s boiled, this plant also has some medicinal properties. It’s used to treat mouth sores, and it was used by many Native American tribes.

Kelp

Kelp plant
Kelp plant

Rich in vitamin K, this plant can be found almost everywhere in the world. The best thing about kelp is that it can be eaten raw.

Insects good for consuming

Caterpillars

Caterpillars can be a great protein boost when you find yourself in a survival situation.
Caterpillars can be a great protein boost when you find yourself in a survival situation.

Although they don’t look edible, there are few types of caterpillars that can replace a good meal. Make sure you avoid the ones with bright colors, and you’ll be safe and full of proteins and energy. Caterpillars are packed with protein, vitamin B, iron, and fat.

Ants

Roasted can be an excellent meal in the wild.
Roasted can be an excellent meal in the wild.

Even though they are edible, when eaten alive they can bite and hurt your mouth. Prevent this by cooking them over a fire, which will also eliminate the bitter taste. Make sure you also remove any soil from them, especially if you find them in an anthill.

Grasshoppers

Make yourself a snack with crunchy roasted grasshoppers
Make yourself a snack with crunchy roasted grasshoppers

These crunchy insects are a great source of calcium and protein. They taste excellent when cooked over a fire, but you can eat them raw as well. In everyday life, grasshoppers can be annoying, and even be seen as a major pest. But, in a survival situation, they can be a real lifesaver.

Termites

You can usually find termites under a log or a stone.
You can usually find termites under a log or a stone.

If you ever see a decaying tree stump of a log, make sure you survey it for termites. They are packed with proteins, more than any insects on this list. One hand of termites can give you the boost for a whole day. The best time to look for termites is in the rain or after a rainstorm since they prefer damp wood.

If you have any comments, please drop us a message on our Outdoor Revival Facebook page.

If you have a good story to tell or blog, let us know about it on our FB page. We’re also happy for article or review submissions; we’d love to hear from you.

We live in a beautiful world, get out there and enjoy it. Outdoor Revival – Reconnecting us all with the outdoors.

 
© Copyright 2015–2021 - Outdoor Revival