Must see places before they disappear from the face of the Earth

By Stef Zisovska
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Must see places before they disappear from the face of the Earth

Stef Zisovska
 
Rainforest
Rainforest
 
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Humankind is well known for its destructive nature and egoistic behavior towards the other species on our planet. Directly, or indirectly all of us contribute to endangering more and more animal and plant species every single day.

Our irrational treatment of Nature does not pass without consequences. With every new step advancement in industry and technology, lots of species suffer irreversible damage.

 

earth-blue-planet
earth-blue-planet

 

Sadly, many species and places have already been wiped off the face of the Earth, and other are still struggling for their existence. Due to the global warming, high pollution, and man’s expansion, many of the world’s incredible places may not be here for much longer.

 

Great Barrier Reef, Australia

This is the largest coral reef in the world which covers 133,000 square miles of the ocean floor. These coral structures have been eroding for years because of environmental changes, such as rising water temperatures, coral bleaching, and extreme water pollution. Within the next 100 years, some say it will disappear completely.

 

Great Barrier Reef Photo Credit
Great Barrier Reef Photo Credit

Venice, Italy 

The most romantic city in the world and the Italian center of art for centuries is threatened by floods every year. The water level is rising each year and damaging the city walls. If the flooding continues at the same pace, there might be no more Venice by the end of this century.

 

Venice
Venice

The Dead Sea, Jordan

The Dead Sea is the lowest point on our planet and ten times more salty than the oceans. Each year this sea loses two billion gallons of water because of mining operations and the diversion of the Jordan River. If you want to float in this sea of history and natural beauty, better do it as soon as possible.

 

Dead Sea Photo Credit
Dead Sea Photo Credit

Maldives

This beautiful island will be completely covered by water if the sea level continues to rise. The risk of total flooding has become so likely that Maldivian government purchased land in other countries, so there’s somewhere for displaced families when the time comes. A great tourist attraction, offering incredible outdoor activities, could be gone forever in the next 100 years.

 

Maldives Photo Credit
Maldives Photo Credit

The Alps  

One of the world’s biggest ski attractions is melting slowly as a result of climate changes. According to the scientists, by 2050 glaciers could disappear entirely.

 

 

Alps 
Alps 

Madagascar rainforest

The tropical rainforest of Madagascar was once 120,000 square miles and today there are only 20,000 square miles left. The forests are eroding very fast, mainly because of human activities like deforestation and logging.

Around 75% of the animals species that live on Madagascar can’t be found anywhere else in the world. It’s scary to think that maybe we will never see some of them ever again.

 

Madagascar lemur
Madagascar lemur

Mount Kilimanjaro, Tanzania

10,000 year old ice on the tallest peak in Africa has melted in the last century. Once again, climate change is to blame for this rapid destruction.

 

Mount Kilimanjaro Photo Credit
Mount Kilimanjaro Photo Credit

 

Time is running out fast for these amazing destinations, with their history and beauty. Soon it will be too late as things have been going downhill fast in these last few decades.

These are only a few of the numerous places on the brink of extinction. Visit some of them while there is still a time.

 

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